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Pakistan – Level 3: Reconsider Travel

Reconsider travel to Pakistan due to COVID-19, terrorism, and sectarian violence. Some areas have increased risk. Read the entire Travel Advisory.
Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel.
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a Level 3 Travel Health Notice for Pakistan due to COVID-19.
The Government of Pakistan has lifted stay-at-home orders and allowed the resumption of intercity domestic travel and mass transit services in most cities. Travel restrictions, stay-at-home orders, business closures, and other restrictions can be reintroduced at any time within Pakistan due to COVID-19. Visit the Embassy’s COVID-19 page for more information on COVID-19 in Pakistan.
Do not travel to:
Balochistan province and Khyber Pakhtunkhwa (KPK) province, including the former Federally Administered Tribal Areas (FATA), due to terrorism and kidnapping.                     
The immediate vicinity of the Line of Control due to terrorism and the potential for armed conflict.
Terrorist groups continue plotting attacks in Pakistan. A local history of terrorism and ongoing ideological aspirations of violence by extremist elements have led to indiscriminate attacks on civilian as well as local military and police targets. Terrorists may attack with little or no warning, targeting transportation hubs, markets, shopping malls, military installations, airports, universities, tourist locations, schools, hospitals, places of worship, and government facilities. Terrorists have targeted U.S. diplomats and diplomatic facilities in the past.
Terrorist attacks continue to happen across Pakistan, with most occurring in Balochistan and KPK, including the former FATA. Large-scale terrorist attacks have resulted in numerous casualties.
Sectarian violence remains concerning in Pakistan. Members of various communities, some of whom were U.S. citizens, have been harassed, assaulted, and killed, both in sectarian clashes and in deliberate attacks. The Government of Pakistan enforces blasphemy laws that provide for harsh sentences, including the death penalty.
Pakistan’s security environment has improved since 2014, when Pakistani security forces undertook concerted counter-terrorist and counter-militant operations. There are greater security resources and infrastructure in the major cities, particularly Islamabad, and security forces in these areas may be more readily able to respond to an emergency compared to other areas of the country. While threats still exist, terrorist attacks are rare in Islamabad.
The U.S. government has limited ability to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens in Pakistan due to the security environment. Travel by U.S. government personnel within Pakistan is restricted, and additional restrictions on movements by U.S. government personnel outside of U.S. diplomatic facilities may occur at any time, depending on local circumstances and security conditions, which can change suddenly.
The U.S. Consulate General in Peshawar is unable to provide any consular services to U.S. citizens. U.S. citizens seeking consular services should contact U.S. Embassy Islamabad.
Due to risks to civil aviation operating within or near Pakistan, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has issued a Notice to Airmen (NOTAM) and/or a Special Federal Aviation Regulation (SFAR). For more information, U.S. citizens should consult the Federal Aviation Administration’s Prohibitions, Restrictions, and Notices.
U.S. citizens residing or traveling in Pakistan are advised that U.S. Embassy and Mission personnel are not permitted to travel on any Pakistani airline without prior authorization.
Read the country information page.
If you decide to travel to Pakistan:
See the U.S. Embassy’s web page regarding COVID-19.
Visit the CDC’s webpage on Travel and COVID-19.
Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.
Remain aware of your surroundings and local events.
Vary travel routes and timing, especially for routine trips.
Be cognizant of your surroundings, particularly around public markets, restaurants, government and military institutions, and other locations.
Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive security alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
Review the Crime and Safety Reports for Pakistan.
U.S. citizens who travel abroad should always have a contingency plan for emergencies. Review the Traveler’s Checklist.
Balochistan Province – Do Not Travel
Do not travel to Balochistan province. Active terrorist groups, an active separatist movement, sectarian conflicts, and deadly terrorist attacks against civilians, government offices, and security forces destabilize the province, including all major cities. In 2019, several bombings occurred in Balochistan province that resulted in injuries and deaths.
Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.
KPK Province, including the former FATA – Do Not Travel
Do not travel to KPK province, which includes the former FATA. Active terrorist and insurgent groups routinely conduct attacks against civilians, non-governmental organizations (NGOs), government offices, and security forces. These groups historically have not discriminated between government officials and civilians. Assassination and kidnapping attempts are common, including the targeting of polio eradication teams.
Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.
Vicinity of Line of Control – Do Not Travel
Do not travel to the India-Pakistan border. Militant groups are known to operate in the area. India and Pakistan maintain a strong military presence on both sides of the border. Indian and Pakistani military forces periodically exchange gunfire and artillery fire across the Line of Control (LoC). The only official Pakistan-India border crossing point for persons who are not citizens of India or Pakistan is in the province of Punjab between Wagah, Pakistan, and Atari, India. Travelers are advised to confirm the status of the border crossing prior to commencing travel. An Indian visa is required to enter India, and no visa services are available at the border.
Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.
Last Update: Reissued after periodic review with edits regarding sectarian violence.

Reconsider travel to Pakistan due to COVID-19, terrorism, and sectarian violence. Some areas have increased risk. Read the entire Travel Advisory.

Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a Level 3 Travel Health Notice for Pakistan due to COVID-19.

The Government of Pakistan has lifted stay-at-home orders and allowed the resumption of intercity domestic travel and mass transit services in most cities. Travel restrictions, stay-at-home orders, business closures, and other restrictions can be reintroduced at any time within Pakistan due to COVID-19. Visit the Embassy’s COVID-19 page for more information on COVID-19 in Pakistan.

Do not travel to:

  • Balochistan province and Khyber Pakhtunkhwa (KPK) province, including the former Federally Administered Tribal Areas (FATA), due to terrorism and kidnapping.                     
  • The immediate vicinity of the Line of Control due to terrorism and the potential for armed conflict.

Terrorist groups continue plotting attacks in Pakistan. A local history of terrorism and ongoing ideological aspirations of violence by extremist elements have led to indiscriminate attacks on civilian as well as local military and police targets. Terrorists may attack with little or no warning, targeting transportation hubs, markets, shopping malls, military installations, airports, universities, tourist locations, schools, hospitals, places of worship, and government facilities. Terrorists have targeted U.S. diplomats and diplomatic facilities in the past.

Terrorist attacks continue to happen across Pakistan, with most occurring in Balochistan and KPK, including the former FATA. Large-scale terrorist attacks have resulted in numerous casualties.

Sectarian violence remains concerning in Pakistan. Members of various communities, some of whom were U.S. citizens, have been harassed, assaulted, and killed, both in sectarian clashes and in deliberate attacks. The Government of Pakistan enforces blasphemy laws that provide for harsh sentences, including the death penalty.

Pakistan’s security environment has improved since 2014, when Pakistani security forces undertook concerted counter-terrorist and counter-militant operations. There are greater security resources and infrastructure in the major cities, particularly Islamabad, and security forces in these areas may be more readily able to respond to an emergency compared to other areas of the country. While threats still exist, terrorist attacks are rare in Islamabad.

The U.S. government has limited ability to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens in Pakistan due to the security environment. Travel by U.S. government personnel within Pakistan is restricted, and additional restrictions on movements by U.S. government personnel outside of U.S. diplomatic facilities may occur at any time, depending on local circumstances and security conditions, which can change suddenly.

The U.S. Consulate General in Peshawar is unable to provide any consular services to U.S. citizens. U.S. citizens seeking consular services should contact U.S. Embassy Islamabad.

Due to risks to civil aviation operating within or near Pakistan, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has issued a Notice to Airmen (NOTAM) and/or a Special Federal Aviation Regulation (SFAR). For more information, U.S. citizens should consult the Federal Aviation Administration’s Prohibitions, Restrictions, and Notices.

U.S. citizens residing or traveling in Pakistan are advised that U.S. Embassy and Mission personnel are not permitted to travel on any Pakistani airline without prior authorization.

Read the country information page.

If you decide to travel to Pakistan:

Balochistan Province – Do Not Travel

Do not travel to Balochistan province. Active terrorist groups, an active separatist movement, sectarian conflicts, and deadly terrorist attacks against civilians, government offices, and security forces destabilize the province, including all major cities. In 2019, several bombings occurred in Balochistan province that resulted in injuries and deaths.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

KPK Province, including the former FATA – Do Not Travel

Do not travel to KPK province, which includes the former FATA. Active terrorist and insurgent groups routinely conduct attacks against civilians, non-governmental organizations (NGOs), government offices, and security forces. These groups historically have not discriminated between government officials and civilians. Assassination and kidnapping attempts are common, including the targeting of polio eradication teams.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Vicinity of Line of Control – Do Not Travel

Do not travel to the India-Pakistan border. Militant groups are known to operate in the area. India and Pakistan maintain a strong military presence on both sides of the border. Indian and Pakistani military forces periodically exchange gunfire and artillery fire across the Line of Control (LoC). The only official Pakistan-India border crossing point for persons who are not citizens of India or Pakistan is in the province of Punjab between Wagah, Pakistan, and Atari, India. Travelers are advised to confirm the status of the border crossing prior to commencing travel. An Indian visa is required to enter India, and no visa services are available at the border.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Last Update: Reissued after periodic review with edits regarding sectarian violence.

Credit : travel.state.gov: Travel Advisories

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